WRAPOLOGY TEAMS UP WITH MARINE BIOLOGISTS

a6711905-df43-480d-b4f8-03719a6a3ab6

FIND OUT THE IMPACTS OF COVID-19 ON MARINE WILDLIFE IN HONG KONG

In March, Wrapology teamed up with Marine Biologist Lindsay Porter, Senior Research Scientist, Sea Mammal Research Unit, St Andrews University.

Since the outbreak of Covid-19 in February, the Government of Hong Kong has put restrictions on ferries, many of which travel through the natural habitat of native marine animals; mainly dolphins and porpoises.

As part of her research, Lindsay and her team spent 2 weeks on board a vessel (supplied by Wrapology) to research and document how the native wildlife was being impacted by the measures put in place.

Lindsay Porter said  “During the 2 weeks, it was incredible to see the increase in dolphin and porpoise activity. Hopefully the research provided will provide enough evidence to the Hong Kong Government for them to consider moving the shipping channel a few km away from these animals natural habitat.”

In addition to the research on Marine Wildlife, Wrapology supplied a range of packaging samples to test how they degrade if they end up in the sea.
The samples included art card, paper over board, paper over board with lamination, cotton, bagasse (sugarcane) and ABS plastic.

Over the coming months, we’ll keep evaluating how the samples react in a marine environment, how they degrade and what chemicals they omit into their surrounding environment. Its important for most of our customers to know that should the products not be recycled, they don’t end up polluting the seas and beaches in the future.

IMG_0192

 

9428B244FEFE207EB39E2CA75247425D

The sailing vessel supplied by Wrapology was anchored for 2 weeks off the coast of Soko Islands. During the 1990s, a community of some 10,000 Vietnamese refugees lived on the islands. Now, however, it is only populated by birds, butterflies and reptiles

PHOTO-2020-03-25-06-44-47

At 6am each morning, the team would jump into the rib and cover the 3km square area where the mammals would inhabit. Typically this area would be a channel for fast ferries but since the travel restrictions, the fast ferries have stopped and the mammals are flourishing in their new quiet habitat.